PDA

View Full Version : Tethering Complaint Filed Against Verizon with FCC by Free Press



wicked
06-06-2011, 07:03 PM
http://static.droidnetwork.net/wicked/article/droidx-tether-verizon-600x399.jpg





The blocking of tethering apps by Verizon just got very real after a complaint was filed today through the FCC by Free Press which could potentially impact the future of LTE. This has been one of those hot subjects around Droid Life over the last few weeks, so we couldn’t help but smile a little when we saw a group of this magnitude taking it straight to the top.

As you may recall, Droid-Life first reported news (http://www.droid-life.com/2011/04/29/is-wireless-tether-about-to-get-the-android-axe-carriers-finally-starting-to-block-it/) that tethering apps had either been removed or purposefully blocked from being viewed and downloaded to Verizon devices. The move wasn’t necessarily a surprise since we know that Verizon likes to force you into purchasing an additional mobile hotspot service on top of your data plan, but the move was bold. And then just last week we noticed (http://www.droid-life.com/2011/05/31/verizon-begins-blocking-wireless-tether-asks-that-you-purchase-a-plan/) that even if you had managed to load up a third party app from outside the market to tether, that Verizon was blocking you from doing so.

People grew angry at this for a number of reasons – and the complaint filed today by Free Press pretty much touches on them all.


Continue reading @ Droid-Life (http://www.droid-life.com/2011/06/06/tethering-complaint-filed-with-fcc-by-free-press-against-verizon/)

dschwartz0815
06-06-2011, 07:04 PM
Aaaahahaha stupid commies lol

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

cory46
06-06-2011, 07:04 PM
you should merge the one I posted with yours... yours looks a lot better haha

wicked
06-06-2011, 07:08 PM
you should merge the one I posted with yours... yours looks a lot better haha

It's ok bud. Doesn't hurt to have them in 2 places. One in news and the other you posted. ;)

cory46
06-06-2011, 07:09 PM
ha ok I just didnt want to clutter... but your right wont hurt... someone might not see it there but here and vice versa

Jrod301
06-06-2011, 07:12 PM
Interesting. Nice to see someone fighting for the minority for once. Not expecting much, but still nice to see!

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

eric eakin
06-06-2011, 07:19 PM
great... another debate! :/

skennelly
06-06-2011, 07:27 PM
Interesting. Nice to see someone fighting for the minority for once. Not expecting much, but still nice to see!

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

No offense and not to get political, but the "minority" is the only group that has people fight for them.

deaffin
06-06-2011, 08:35 PM
And then just last week we noticed that even if you had managed to load up a third party app from outside the market to tether, that Verizon was blocking you from doing so.

Is this correct? Because I'm posting this with my laptop that is currently tethered to my Droid X using Wireless Tether App.

Snow02
06-06-2011, 08:37 PM
Is this correct? Because I'm posting this with my laptop that is currently tethered to my Droid X using Wireless Tether App.

They're referencing the block in gingerbread on the X I believe.

cory46
06-07-2011, 10:45 AM
Tether workaround posted on Droid-life, don't know if it works I don't use the service... sorry folks

Tip: DROIDX and 2 Gingerbread Wireless Tether Work-Around (Updated) - Droid Life: A Droid Community Blog (http://www.droid-life.com/2011/06/07/tip-droidx-gingerbread-wireless-tether-work-around/)

X24
06-07-2011, 05:31 PM
Tether workaround posted on Droid-life, don't know if it works I don't use the service... sorry folks

Tip: DROIDX and 2 Gingerbread Wireless Tether Work-Around (Updated) - Droid Life: A Droid Community Blog (http://www.droid-life.com/2011/06/07/tip-droidx-gingerbread-wireless-tether-work-around/)

Just tried that and got this as soon as I opened a new window:

Nerdslogic
06-07-2011, 05:48 PM
Honestly I don't think it's going to happen. There is missing information there as far as where they say they have stand point. Like the whole "can't restrict" part.....check this out. It's a quote I took from Android Police....I know it's long

If you’ve been watching the blogosphere over the last few days, you might have seen an article or two about a "complaint" filed with the FCC over Verizon’s block on tethering applications in the Android Market.

The complainant’s argument goes something like this: Verizon purchased the 700MHz spectrum ("block C" of the spectrum) back in 2007, and that spectrum is now used by Verizon for its 4G LTE service. That purchase, ala Google and other net neutrality lobbyists, came with one seemingly large caveat: Verizon (or AT&T, or anyone who bought in that spectrum) could not "deny, limit, or restrict" the phones using that spectrum in particular ways: phones must be carrier unlocked, able to access all parts of the web, and run any software. At least, in theory. If you want it straight from the source, here’s Free Press’s (the consumer advocacy group filing the complaint) interpretation of things:

As a condition of Verizon’s license for the C Block of the upper 700 MHz block, Verizon and similar broadband providers using the spectrum are not permitted to “deny, limit, or restrict” the ability of their customers to use the applications or devices of their choosing. Recent reports reveal that Verizon has been doing just that by asking Google to disable tethering applications in the Android Market. Tethering applications, which allow users to make their phones into mobile hot-spots, implicate both the customers’ ability to use both the applications and devices of their choice.

These conditions were called "Carterfone protections," and since day one they have been roundly (and rightly) criticized as damn near useless in actually effectuating their purpose. Here’s what Susan P. Crawford (a major supporter of net neutrality) had to say about them:

The no-locking, no-blocking requirements are hedged in by substantial limitations: the winning licensee will be able to lock and block devices and applications as long as they can show that their actions are related to "reasonable network management and protection," or "compliance with applicable regulatory requirements." In other words, as long as the discrimination can be shown to be connected (however indirectly) to some vision of ‘network management,’ it will be permitted." (Emphasis ours)


Now, how do these loopholes reconcile with the neutrality provisions cited by Free Press? They don’t, really. Actually, they all but cancel out the Carterfone protections. A carrier merely has to present the argument to the FCC that tethering (or any software/hardware modification) interferes with or harms the carrier’s network management or security efforts, and provide some rudimentary vehicle for that argument – there is no requirement of proof.

Tethering apps don’t stand a chance against these exceptions to the rule, particularly in Verizon’s case. With the vast majority of its smartphone customers currently on unlimited data plans, there’s even a hint of merit in Verizon’s argument that it needs to control access to tethering to prevent end-user abuse of that "unlimited" data, even if that abuse is only committed by a very small number of individuals. That argument alone is a "winner." In the future, though, Verizon won’t have unlimited data, so how’s that going to work?

For tiered data plans, you might think things would get a little hazier, but "network security and management" provides another easy out – unauthorized tethering allows unauthorized devices (eg, your laptop) to access Verizon’s network. Voila. It could also just as easily be argued that unauthorized tethering software could cause people to leave their phones with unsecure hotspots open, exposing Verizon’s network (and that somehow the carrier tethering option stops that), or something else utterly unlikely. Basically, any argument Verizon could make that leads to the statement "… and this prevents us from operating and/or securing our network exactly how we want to" will hold water.

And the same points can be used against rooting, unlocking, or using custom software. It’s a little depressing, really. But it’s the present reality of the way the rules are written.

These arguments sound ridiculous and dodgy to us, but the FCC will probably eat them up, because they’re all certainly possible scenarios. And then there’s the millions the carriers spent in lobbying to get those loophole provisions worded just as they wanted them.

Is Verizon being kind of shady about this whole affair? Yep, and that’s not cool. Are they within their rights to do it? Most likely.
Quotes from DSLReports

Kr0n0Tr1pR
06-09-2011, 07:32 PM
Tried the droidlife method posted above and ran into the same Verizon BBAC customer referral page everyone else does... Droid X rooted GB .591 Apex 2.0

Jersey
06-09-2011, 07:51 PM
Honestly I don't think it's going to happen. There is missing information there as far as where they say they have stand point. Like the whole "can't restrict" part.....check this out. It's a quote I took from Android Police....I know it's long

If you’ve been watching the blogosphere over the last few days, you might have seen an article or two about a "complaint" filed with the FCC over Verizon’s block on tethering applications in the Android Market.

The complainant’s argument goes something like this: Verizon purchased the 700MHz spectrum ("block C" of the spectrum) back in 2007, and that spectrum is now used by Verizon for its 4G LTE service. That purchase, ala Google and other net neutrality lobbyists, came with one seemingly large caveat: Verizon (or AT&T, or anyone who bought in that spectrum) could not "deny, limit, or restrict" the phones using that spectrum in particular ways: phones must be carrier unlocked, able to access all parts of the web, and run any software. At least, in theory. If you want it straight from the source, here’s Free Press’s (the consumer advocacy group filing the complaint) interpretation of things:

As a condition of Verizon’s license for the C Block of the upper 700 MHz block, Verizon and similar broadband providers using the spectrum are not permitted to “deny, limit, or restrict” the ability of their customers to use the applications or devices of their choosing. Recent reports reveal that Verizon has been doing just that by asking Google to disable tethering applications in the Android Market. Tethering applications, which allow users to make their phones into mobile hot-spots, implicate both the customers’ ability to use both the applications and devices of their choice.

These conditions were called "Carterfone protections," and since day one they have been roundly (and rightly) criticized as damn near useless in actually effectuating their purpose. Here’s what Susan P. Crawford (a major supporter of net neutrality) had to say about them:

The no-locking, no-blocking requirements are hedged in by substantial limitations: the winning licensee will be able to lock and block devices and applications as long as they can show that their actions are related to "reasonable network management and protection," or "compliance with applicable regulatory requirements." In other words, as long as the discrimination can be shown to be connected (however indirectly) to some vision of ‘network management,’ it will be permitted." (Emphasis ours)


Now, how do these loopholes reconcile with the neutrality provisions cited by Free Press? They don’t, really. Actually, they all but cancel out the Carterfone protections. A carrier merely has to present the argument to the FCC that tethering (or any software/hardware modification) interferes with or harms the carrier’s network management or security efforts, and provide some rudimentary vehicle for that argument – there is no requirement of proof.

Tethering apps don’t stand a chance against these exceptions to the rule, particularly in Verizon’s case. With the vast majority of its smartphone customers currently on unlimited data plans, there’s even a hint of merit in Verizon’s argument that it needs to control access to tethering to prevent end-user abuse of that "unlimited" data, even if that abuse is only committed by a very small number of individuals. That argument alone is a "winner." In the future, though, Verizon won’t have unlimited data, so how’s that going to work?

For tiered data plans, you might think things would get a little hazier, but "network security and management" provides another easy out – unauthorized tethering allows unauthorized devices (eg, your laptop) to access Verizon’s network. Voila. It could also just as easily be argued that unauthorized tethering software could cause people to leave their phones with unsecure hotspots open, exposing Verizon’s network (and that somehow the carrier tethering option stops that), or something else utterly unlikely. Basically, any argument Verizon could make that leads to the statement "… and this prevents us from operating and/or securing our network exactly how we want to" will hold water.

And the same points can be used against rooting, unlocking, or using custom software. It’s a little depressing, really. But it’s the present reality of the way the rules are written.

These arguments sound ridiculous and dodgy to us, but the FCC will probably eat them up, because they’re all certainly possible scenarios. And then there’s the millions the carriers spent in lobbying to get those loophole provisions worded just as they wanted them.

Is Verizon being kind of shady about this whole affair? Yep, and that’s not cool. Are they within their rights to do it? Most likely.
Quotes from DSLReports

If that's the case that Verizon would like to go with then they shouldn't be lobbying the service for 20 bucks a month, or whatever it is, to customers either.... they misewell do away with the process of being able to teather all together

sent from my DROIDX on liberty .7 blue bread and loving it!

boogawho
06-09-2011, 10:18 PM
For those having trouble with DROID life workaround, changing the SSID seemed to fix the problem (at least for me). Running liberty 0.7.

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

JNEHAMA
06-10-2011, 02:27 AM
For those having trouble with DROID life workaround, changing the SSID seemed to fix the problem (at least for me). Running liberty 0.7.

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

What to? When I use it the 3G signal drops out.
Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

Snow02
06-10-2011, 03:02 AM
Changing the ssid isn't going to affect anything.

zodder
06-16-2011, 08:43 AM
No offense and not to get political, but the "minority" is the only group that has people fight for them.
Roger that haha

Kr0n0Tr1pR
06-16-2011, 03:58 PM
For those having trouble with DROID life workaround, changing the SSID seemed to fix the problem (at least for me). Running liberty 0.7.

Sent from my DROIDX using Droid X Forums

anyone else have success with this? At work, can't try it right now